Select Page

LEFA founder samples a bit of the near future – Test drives a Tesla

LEFA founder samples a bit of the near future – Test drives a Tesla

Melkies Ausiku, the founder of ride-hailing app, LEFA, tasted the future of transportation when he test drove a Tesla in Germany this week.

As someone that has a passion for all forms of transport and innovation, Ausiku has long dreamed of being able to drive a Tesla Electric Vehicle (EV). In Germany, where it seems almost every new car sold is either fully electric or a hybrid, he finally got his chance.

Ausiku, foresees a future of transport where the fleet of LEFA cars will consist of electric cars that produce no emission, cut down on fuel costs, noise and exhaust pollution and can ferry the clients of LEFA from A to B, safely, securely and with the minimum carbon footprint.

“I’ve always admired Elon Musk an am a huge fan of Tesla cars, having now driven one myself it surpassed all my expectations. Although it may take a while and our infrastructure will need to adapt to accommodate EV’s, I have no doubt it is our future, just as it is across the world. Doing it in such as style as the Tesla delivers is just the icing on the cake. To accelerate mass adoption In the European market, governments are offering various programs such as tax benefits or purchase subsidies to individuals who buy electric vehicles. The Namibian government can adopt a similar strategy to encourage adoption of electric vehicles in Namibia,” Ausiku said.

In Namibia, LEFA is at the forefront of the transportation revolution and will engage and collaborate with stakeholders and investors nationally and internationally to push the boundaries of innovation within the transportation sector to make it safer for all road-users and minimize our environmental impact.


LEFA founder, Melkies Ausiku, experiences the future of transport by road testing a Tesla in Germany. Tesla vehicles are equipped with advanced safety features, making them much safer to operate. (Provided)


 

About The Author

Intern

The Economist accommodates two interns every year, one per semester. They are given less demanding, softer issues to hone their skills, often with a specific leaning to social issues. Today, many of our interns are respected journalists or career professionals at economic and financial institutions. - Ed.


Rain Rate >UTC + 2 hrs = Namibian Time<