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Public administration set on firm footing

The ever-popular Professor Joseph Diescho has recently been appointed as the Executive Director at the fledgling Namibia Institute of Public Administration and Management. The professor is known for his frank views and his criticism of cronyism and ineptitude.

The ever-popular Professor Joseph Diescho has recently been appointed as the Executive Director at the fledgling Namibia Institute of Public Administration and Management. The professor is known for his frank views and his criticism of cronyism and ineptitude.

Earlier in August, the Namibia Institute for Public Administration and Management (Nipam) published its first annual report, covering the initial 18 month period ending 31 March 2013.
The auditor’s report confirmed that this newly-formed public servants training institute is on a firm financial footing and managed in accordance with internationally accepted norms. Public servants can attend a range of extra-curricular courses at Nipam. Additionally, since Nipam is in the process of becoming an accredited tertiary training institution, students can read for a Bachelor’s degree in Public Administration.
“NIPAM has a healthy and strong balance sheet, finances were managed prudently and expenses are kept well under control. While we appreciate that Nipam requires ongoing support of its stakeholders, also financially, I’m happy to say that it has made a first effort towards putting processes and a business plan in place,“ said Prof Joseph Diescho, the newly-appointed Executive Director.
In terms of Corporate Governance, the Nipam Governing Council sets standards for managing the institution mindful of exercising reasonable care in reaching its objectives. A rigorous system is in place to ensure the Institute is managed according to approved corporate governance principles. Nipam is a state-owned enterprise, and qualifies for a state subsidy.
During the reporting period, Nipam reported a surplus of N$12 million. As an organisation with no profit motive, annual surpluses are directed back into the business. “Our aim is to eventually become self-sustainable on the operational side of things. It is not within our mandate to make a profit, yet our cashflow needs to be of such a nature that we remain a going concern,” said Prof Diescho.
“Starting an organisation from scratch, where you have to go as far as developing letterheads, creating procedures and processes and at the same time roll out new courses and programmes, is a challenging and demanding process. I’d like to thank my predecessors, Dr Roland Msiska and Elsie Nghikembua for the tremendous progress they have achieved during the period under review. Equally, my sincere thanks goes to our line ministry, being the Office of the Prime Minister, the Nipam Governing Council, the Training and Development Board and all the management and staff who contributed to developing the organisation to the institution we can look upon with pride,” he said.

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