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Meat Board to assess competitiveness of the local meat industry

Meat Board to assess competitiveness of the local meat industry

The Meat Board of Namibia has commenced with consultation to evaluate the competitiveness
of the slaughter industry in Namibia compared to the export of livestock.

The process which is expected to be completed by April 2019, comes after, the industry experienced a decrease in local slaughter numbers, while the export of livestock to South Africa gained momentum.

The Meat Board said that this is mainly as a result of local abattoirs becoming more unproductive due to reduced slaughter numbers and low slaughter prices.

“Namibia as a predominantly livestock and meat exporting country, must maintain a healthy slaughter industry operating in an optimum environment. The Namibian livestock export market has been developed over many years and must be preserved at all costs. All components of the value chain, including potential export countries, such as the Middle East, will be incorporated in the Competitiveness Report,” Meat Board stated.

Meat Board’s latest Meat Chronicle report shows that the beef and lamb sectors dominate the industry and collectively account for 86% of all livestock consumed each year. About 84% of beef, 77% of sheep and 97% of goats are exported every year, the bulk of which is earmarked for South African consumption.

Currently, no pork is exported to partner markets., which makes Namibia a net exporter of beef, sheep and goats. More specifically, Namibia produced a net trade surplus of 6,700 tons of beef and 2,900 tons of mutton in 2018. In addition, Namibia exported more than 305,000 live cattle, more than 450,000 live sheep and more than 145,000 live goats on a net basis to partner countries in 2018.

Apart from South Africa, Hong Kong, Botswana, Norway and the UK remain Namibia’s important export destinations.


 

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