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Shell positions for oil revival

Senior Shell officials welcomed the the Minister of Mines and Energy, Hon Isak Katali and other government dignataries to the opening of Shell’s new Windhoek offices on Tuesday this week. The Shell high

Officially opening Shell’s new Windhoek office are, from the left, Dennis Zekveld (Shell Namibia Country Chairman), Alistair Milne (Shell VP Sub-Saharan Africa), Obeth Kandjoze, Managing Director of Namcor, Hon Isak Katali, the Minister of Mines and Energy, Rob Donnelly (Shell Senior Advisor Europe and Africa) and Jan Deknatel (Shell Exploration Venture Lead).

Officially opening Shell’s new Windhoek office are, from the left, Dennis Zekveld (Shell Namibia Country Chairman), Alistair Milne (Shell VP Sub-Saharan Africa), Obeth Kandjoze, Managing Director of Namcor, Hon Isak Katali, the Minister of Mines and Energy, Rob Donnelly (Shell Senior Advisor Europe and Africa) and Jan Deknatel (Shell Exploration Venture Lead).

brass expressed their excitement about working in Namibia’s emerging offshore oil and gas industry.
“Earlier in 2014, Shell Namibia Upstream BV (Shell) acquired a 90% controlling interest in Petroleum Exploration License 39 (PEL 39) located offshore Namibia. The license area covers blocks 2913A and 2914B on the Namibian / South African border and measures some 12,000km²” said Dennis Zekveld, Shell Namibia’s Country Chairman.
Flaunting their green credentials, the Shell delegation said the planning of the seismic survey took into account fishing activities and the presence of marine animals and Shell has been constructive in cooperating with the fishing industry on a data gathering exercise.
“Once we receive the seismic data and get an understanding of the geological subsurface, we can interpret this data and make a decision on drilling an exploration well,” said Alastair Milne, Shell’s Vice President for Sub-Saharan Africa.
Giving an update on offshore Namibia, Milne said that the Shell blocks has large potential for oil and gas prospects.  Shell is in the early stages of exploration in Namibia. Experience teaches that it can take a number of years to determine if there are sufficient reserves to progress to an oil and gas production stage.

“Opening an office in Windhoek provides us with an opportunity to work more closely with the people of Namibia and make a real sustainable impact to the country,’ says Dennis Zekveld who has relocated from the US to Namibia to head up the Shell operation.
Shell said it aims to contribute to socio-economic development in Namibia. According to the Country Chairman, Shell collaborates with Namibian partners on skills development, road safety, and educational projects.
“Should commercially viable amounts of oil or gas be found offshore, Namibia could significantly benefit in terms of a stable energy supply, economic growth and job creation.” This is Shell’s second attempt at oil exploration in Namibian territorial waters.

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