Select Page

Namibia bans the importation of live poultry and products from SA due to Avian Influenza outbreak – Measures to remain in place until further notice

Namibia bans the importation of live poultry and products from SA due to Avian Influenza outbreak – Measures to remain in place until further notice

The import or in-transit movement of live poultry and their raw products from South Africa was suspended as of 17 May the Ministry of Agriculture, Water and Land Reform  announced.

The Directorate of Veterinary Services which is under the Ministry made this call following the Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI) outbreak that was detected in one commercial poultry farm on 9 April 2021, by the South African Veterinary Authority.

“Namibia has subsequently suspended the importation from that specific commercial farm however, the recent report from South African Veterinary Authorities indicates that eight more new commercial poultry farms got infected with HPAI since the index case,” the Directorate’s  Chief Veterinary officer, Albertina Shilongo said this week.

According to Shilongo, since the incubation period of the disease is 21 days as per the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) standards, the suspension takes effect 21 day prior to the date of start of the event.

“In this case, the even started on 9 April, thus the start of the suspension is the 19 March, therefore consignment containing poultry products packed in their final packaging on or after the date of start of suspension will be refused entry into Namibia,” she added.

Shilongo meanwhile, said all previously issued import and in transit permits to import poultry and their products originating from South Africa re hereby cancelled and recalled with immediate effect, which will remain effective until further notice.

“We continue to allow the importation of poultry and their products that are transiting through South Africa originating from other countries that are free of HPAI,” she concluded.


 

About The Author

Mandisa Rasmeni

Mandisa Rasmeni has worked as reporter at the Economist for the past five years, first on the entertainment beat but now focussing more on community, social and health reporting. She is a born writer and is working on her degree in Journalism at the Namibia University of Science and Technology (NUST). She believes education is the greatest equalizer. She is the epitome of perseverance, having started as the newspaper's receptionist in 2013.