Select Page

Corridor Group in Lusaka

From left to right: Johny M. Smith (CEO of the WBCG), Sunday Chikoti (Zambian Ministry of Commerce, Trade and Industry), Michelle Farmer (the First Secretary of the High Commission of the Republic of Namibia to Zambia), Andrew Sinyangwe (Business Development Manager for WBCG Zambia), Prisca Chikwashi (CEOof the Zambia Association of Chambers of Commerce), Nathan Chishimba (Corporate Affairs Manager of Barrick Lumwana Mine), and Christian Faure (Executive:  Marketing and Strategic Business Development of Namport).

From left to right: Johny M. Smith (CEO of the WBCG), Sunday Chikoti (Zambian Ministry of Commerce, Trade and Industry), Michelle Farmer (the First Secretary of the High Commission of the Republic of Namibia to Zambia), Andrew Sinyangwe (Business Development Manager for WBCG Zambia), Prisca Chikwashi (CEOof the Zambia Association of Chambers of Commerce), Nathan Chishimba (Corporate Affairs Manager of Barrick Lumwana Mine), and Christian Faure (Executive: Marketing and Strategic Business Development of Namport).

The Walvis Bay Corridor Group (WBCG) hosted an information session in Lusaka, Zambia earlier in August to improve awareness of the benefits of utilizing the Walvis Bay – Ndola – Lubumbashi Development Corridor (WBNLDC) via the Port of Walvis Bay as the preferred trade route between Zambia and  international markets. The session highlighted the efficiencies of the port as well as the latest developments to expand its capacity.

The session was addressed by the First Secretary of the High Commission of  Namibia to Zambia, Ms. Michelle Farmer, as well as by the Chief Executive Officer of the Zambia Association of Chambers of Commerce, Ms. Prisca Chikwashi and and an official of the Zambian Ministry of Commerce Trade and Industry, Mr Sunday Chikoti.
Speakers from the WBCG, the port of Walvis Bay and Barrick Lumwana Mine reflected on the latest developments and experiences of utilising the corridor. Many stakeholders attending the information session included business people such as road hauliers, freight forwarders; importers and exporters and government agencies.  Among the benefits of utilising the corridor, were noted the short transit time from Walvis Bay to Lusaka, about 3 to 4 days, the safety and security of moving cargo along this corridor, the fast turnaround time at the port and the efficiency of utilising the corridor as a viable alternative trade route especially for cargo from the Middle East and Far East.
The Corridor Group said Zambian importers and exporters benefit even more through the dry port facility at Walvis Bay, that has been established to strengthen trade with Zambia through the port by using this facility as an entry and exit point.
“Namibia’s role as a gateway to Zambia and the rest of SADC has become more prominent and has created more interest from the regional as well as the international market and with more direct shipping calls to Walvis Bay, high efficiencies, short transit times and strategic partnerships, the Walvis Bay Corridor routes are in a robust position to connect the SADC market to the rest of the world”, said Corridor Group CEO, Johny Smith.
The Walvis Bay Corridor Group has opened a branch office in Lusaka in 2005 to focus on establishing and maintaining key business relationships with the transport community to enhance the utilisation of both the corridor and the Walvis Bay port.

 

About The Author

Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!