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Namibia to continue to carefully monitor COVID-19 cases to stay on top of the pandemic – Geingob

Namibia to continue to carefully monitor COVID-19 cases to stay on top of the pandemic – Geingob

The President, HE. Dr Hage Geingob has said that citizens cannot afford to relax now, and must rather intensify the fight against COVID-19.

Geingob said this when he addressed the nation during the 20th COVID-19 briefing on the country’s national COVID-19 measures.

The current dispensation of measures to fight COVID-19 which came into force on 17 October, will expire at midnight, 30 November.

Under the lapsing dispensation, the president had withdrawn the mandatory five-day COVID-19 retest requirement for all travelers who arrive in Namibia with a negative PCR test result as well as said all travelers who arrive in Namibia with a negative PCR test result that is not older than 7 days, will be permitted to enter the country but will be required to undergo 7-days supervised quarantine at home or tourism facility.

“The worst-case scenario as projected by our WHO Models estimated the loss of nearly 4,000 Namibian lives. However, the prompt and decisive measures taken by the government early into the pandemic have materially tempered and shielded our communities from the full wrath of this pandemic,” he added.

Geingob said as the festive season draws closer, public health measures remain the most powerful weapon and they should be observed and enforced at all times.

The president said Namibia must continue with enhancing risk communication, testing, tracing contacts, and timeously isolating cases and continue to use data for decision making among others.

“The National COVID-19 Response and Preparedness Plan, the government will continue to carefully monitor and stay on top of the evolving situation regarding the pandemic,” he added.

Meanwhile, Geingob said public gatherings will remain at 200 people and all non-Namibian travelers arriving in Namibia are still required to present a negative COVID-19 PCR test result from the country of departure, which is not older than 72 hours.


 

About The Author

Mandisa Rasmeni

Mandisa Rasmeni has worked as reporter at the Economist for the past five years, first on the entertainment beat but now focussing more on community, social and health reporting. She is a born writer and is working on her degree in Journalism at the Namibia University of Science and Technology (NUST). She believes education is the greatest equalizer. She is the epitome of perseverance, having started as the newspaper's receptionist in 2013.