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Africans should play a lead role on all issues of peace and security on the continent says Mbumba

Africans should play a lead role on all issues of peace and security on the continent says Mbumba

The country’s Vice President , Dr. Nangolo Mbumba attended the 36th Ordinary Session of the African Union Executive Council in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia on 9 to10 February.

Addressing the Union Mbumba re-affirmed Namibia’s commitment to the continental developmental agenda which is underpinned by peach, security and stability.

“This are are fundamental prerequisites to achieving our collective aspirations of ‘An Integrated, Prosperous and Peaceful Africa, driven by its own citizens and representing a dynamic force globally’,” he added.

He highlighted that the theme for this year’s session, ‘Silencing the Guns: Creating Conducive Conditions for Africa’s Development’, lends itself greatly to reaffirming the Namibia’s commitment to overcoming the impediments to achieving the ‘Africa We Want’.

“We are now at a crucial point, ten years ago, we declared the need to silence the guns by 2020, the year 2020 has arrived and we have not achieved this objective, on the contrary, we now have more unresolved and armed conflicts than we had when we set out on our journey,” he emphasised.

He urged the Union to ask themselves where they have gone wrong and what it is that they have not yet done, which should guide them in overcoming obstacles and moving forward with rededication, determined to let nothing stand in the way of silencing the guns.

“Overcoming this challenge requires of us to strengthen our systems, processes and institutions as a means to provide effective governance,” he said.

Mbumba and his delegation proposed that the 33rd Ordinary Session of the Assembly, mandates the African Representatives on the United Nations Security Council to maintain a common position and play a lead role on all issues of peace and security in Africa.


 

About The Author

Mandisa Rasmeni

Mandisa Rasmeni has worked as reporter at the Economist for the past five years, first on the entertainment beat but now focussing more on community, social and health reporting. She is a born writer and is working on her degree in Journalism at the Namibia University of Science and Technology (NUST). She believes education is the greatest equalizer. She is the epitome of perseverance, having started as the newspaper's receptionist in 2013.