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Local young environmentalists, activists to march against inaction on climate change

Local young environmentalists, activists to march against inaction on climate change

A group of young environmentalist and activist, the Eloolo Permaculture Initiative, will lead the ‘Global Climate Strike’/march which will start off at the Ministry of Environment and Tourism in Windhoek on Friday starting at 11:00.

The Initiative has since invited people interested in the cause/march to bring their own water bottles and posters for the strike.

The Initiative in a statement said that the route will be from the Ministry, to Government Park, to the Parliament Gardens, then to the City of Windhoek ending at Ausspannplatz, where a petition will be handed over to the national and local government leaders.

“Climate Change poses threats to humankind and undermines Namibia’s efforts to achieve key development goals, including poverty reduction, therefore we urge all learners, students and workers with the permission of their school institutions and workplaces to join the demonstration,” the group added.

Meanwhile the Group has since asked for solutions to be implemented to speed up the restoration of the ecosystem and the improvement of the livelihoods of all Namibians including the environment and wildlife.

“Our demands are that the Paris Agreement and the IPCC Report should be followed, to unite behind the science, to stay below 1.5 degree celsious increase in global average atmospheric temperature, to focus on the aspect of equality and justice, clearly stated throughout the Paris Agreement,” they explained.

The Group further emphasised that all thinking people in the world now realise that Climate Change is mainly caused by human activities and will be compounded by natural climate variability.

“The predictions for Africa include water scarcity, degradation of arable land, loss of biodiversity, more desertification and increasing poverty for our people,” they concluded.


 

About The Author

Mandisa Rasmeni

Mandisa Rasmeni has worked as reporter at the Economist for the past five years, first on the entertainment beat but now focussing more on community, social and health reporting. She a born writer and is working on her degree in Journalism at the Namibia University of Science and Technology (NUST). She believes education is the greatest equalizer. She is the epitome of perseverance, having started as the newspaper's receptionist in 2013.