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Benefits of conservation for all

Attending the launch of the policy document are Deputy Minister of Environment and Tourism, Pohamba Shifeta with Maxi Louis, Director of the Namibian Association of CBNRM Support Organizations (NACSO). Also pictured are Elias Kharuxab representing the Southern regions, Dave Kangombe representing the North West regions, Marama Kavita representing central regions, Francis Lisao representing the North Eastern regions and Sem Shikongo,Director of Tourism in the Ministry of Environment and Tourism. (Photograph by Hilma Hashange)

Attending the launch of the policy document are Deputy Minister of Environment and Tourism, Pohamba Shifeta with Maxi Louis, Director of the Namibian Association of CBNRM Support Organizations (NACSO). Also pictured are Elias Kharuxab representing the Southern regions, Dave Kangombe representing the North West regions, Marama Kavita representing central regions, Francis Lisao representing the North Eastern regions and Sem Shikongo,Director of Tourism in the Ministry of Environment and Tourism. (Photograph by Hilma Hashange)

The recently launched National Policy on Community Based Natural Resource Management (CBNRM) is an approach by the government to generate economic benefits through conservation as well as to promote and strengthen the development of local institutions to further promote rural development.
The policy was launched this week by Deputy Minister of Environment and Tourism, Pohamba Shifeta and coincided with the launching of the State of Conservancy Report.
The policy provides a framework that promotes the wise and sustainable use of natural resources on state land outside protected areas. Natural resources for community based management include wildlife, tourist attractions, fish, water, forest resources and vegetation for grazing.
The policy forms part of the CBNRM programme which according to Shifeta, has become a major development programme in the country and a conservation tool. “Since 1996, our Conservancy Programme has grown from a small pilot project to one of the country’s major development programmes, sound practices are therefore needed for the sustainable utilization of our natural resources on an economically beneficial basis,” Shifeta said during the launch.
He added that the policy recognizes the rights and development needs of local communities, the need to promote biodiversity conservation and [it] empowers present and future generations to manage and benefit from the natural resources.
According to Shifeta, the CBNRM programme is firmly entrenched in Namibia’s National Development Plans and Poverty Reduction Strategies, adding that conservancies are explicitly included as part of the country’s rural development strategies in the National Development Plans and Vision 2030.There are currently 79 registered conservancies in the country where thousands of rural communities benefit through employment, cash income, social projects and in-kind benefits.
One of the main aims of the CBNRM programme is to enable conservancies to become financially and institutionally sustainable. Shifeta therefore issued a stern warning to conservancies and groups of individuals to refrain from corrupt activities such as the mismanagement of conservancy funds and resources, adding that the ministry will leave no stone unturned and will bring the culprits to order.
Shifeta also urged conservancy members and traditional authorities to commit to nation building and not indulge in infightings and tribal differences.  “A conservancy is not a tool to divide the community members along political, tribal, racial or ethnic lines but a vehicle towards rural economic emancipation,” the Deputy Minister said.

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Following reverse listing, public can now acquire shareholding in Paratus Namibia

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20 February 2020, Windhoek, Namibia: Paratus Namibia Holdings (PNH) was founded as Nimbus Infrastructure Limited (“Nimbus”), Namibia’s first Capital Pool Company listed on the Namibian Stock Exchange (“NSX”).

Although targeting an initial capital raising of N$300 million, Nimbus nonetheless managed to secure funding to the value of N$98 million through its CPC listing. With a mandate to invest in ICT infrastructure in sub-Sahara Africa, it concluded management agreements with financial partner Cirrus and technology partner, Paratus Telecommunications (Pty) Ltd (“Paratus Namibia”).

Paratus Namibia Managing Director, Andrew Hall

Its first investment was placed in Paratus Namibia, a fully licensed communications operator in Namibia under regulation of the Communications Regulatory Authority of Namibia (CRAN). Nimbus has since been able to increase its capital asset base to close to N$500 million over the past two years.

In order to streamline further investment and to avoid duplicating potential ICT projects in the market between Nimbus and Paratus Namibia, it was decided to consolidate the operations.

Publishing various circulars to shareholders, Nimbus took up a 100% shareholding stake in Paratus Namibia in 2019 and proceeded to apply to have its name changed to Paratus Namibia Holdings with a consolidated board structure to ensure streamlined operations between the capital holdings and the operational arm of the business.

This transaction was approved by the Competitions Commission as well as CRAN, following all the relevant regulatory approvals as well as the necessary requirements in terms of corporate governance structures.

Paratus Namibia has evolved as a fully comprehensive communications operator in Namibia and operates as the head office of the Paratus Group in Africa. Paratus has established a pan-African footprint with operations in six African countries, being: Angola, Botswana, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa and Zambia.

The group has achieved many successes over the years of which more recently includes the building of the Trans-Kalahari Fibre (TKF) project, which connects from the West Africa Cable System (WACS) eastward through Namibia to Botswana and onward to Johannesburg. The TKF also extends northward through Zambia to connect to Dar es Salaam in Tanzania, which made Paratus the first operator to connect the west and east coast of Africa under one Autonomous System Number (ASN).

This means that Paratus is now “exporting” internet capacity to landlocked countries such as Zambia, Botswana, the DRC with more countries to be targeted, and through its extensive African network, Paratus is well-positioned to expand the network even further into emerging ICT territories.

PNH as a fully-listed entity on the NSX, is therefore now the 100% shareholder of Paratus Namibia thereby becoming a public company. PNH is ready to invest in the future of the ICT environment in Namibia. The public is therefore invited and welcome to acquire shares in Paratus Namibia Holdings by speaking to a local stockbroker registered with the NSX. The future is bright, and the opportunities are endless.