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Gallant heroes and heroines honoured with street names in the capital

Gallant heroes and heroines honoured with street names in the capital

The City of Windhoek named and renamed various streets last week during a ceremony in honour of some freedom fighters and fallen sons and daughters of the country.

This gesture by the City Council was aimed at paying homage to the contributions and sacrifices made by the individuals recognised.

The Council said they made a decision to continue changing the image of the City by renaming streets and places with names of those who contributed in different ways, be it political, spiritual or in any form to the betterment of the nation, Africa or the rest of the world.

At the event, Vice President, Dr Nangolo Mbumba,in a statement delivered on his behalf by Hon.Derek Klazen, Deputy Minister of Urban and Rural Development applauded the City Council for taking a bold decision to pay tribute to the heroes and heroines who through their selfless public service contributed in one way or the other to the well-being and progress of the nation.

He said that street naming should not be simply viewed as a way of designating urban space in recognisable zones, but it serves a purpose of creating and consolidating our collective memory by individuals who lived by the common values of bravery, humanity, selflessness, honour and similar unifying qualities which the Land of the Brave stands for.

“Let us therefore ensure that deserving Namibians from all 14 regions of our country are honoured to ensure that the streets of our Capital City indeed become the living museum of the nation’s collective memory,” he added.

The honouree families expressed their gratitude towards the City for the honour bestowed upon their loved one and the ceremony was treated to some memorable songs of the late Jackson Kaujeua.


Caption: City of Windhoek Officials and Government Representatives pictured with the family of the Late Jackson Kaujeua.


About The Author

Mandisa Rasmeni

Mandisa Rasmeni has worked as reporter at the Economist for the past five years, first on the entertainment beat but now focussing more on community, social and health reporting. She a born writer and is working on her degree in Journalism at the Namibia University of Science and Technology (NUST). She believes education is the greatest equalizer. She is the epitome of perseverance, having started as the newspaper's receptionist in 2013.