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Youth Festival on climate change education draws near

Youth Festival on climate change education draws near

The Youth Empowerment Arts Education Association will host an arts festival that aims at educating the local youth on climate change on 2 September in Windhoek’s Katutura.

The festival will use different art styles; dance, drama, visual arts, fashion and music to raise awareness and educate the public on the shortage of water in the country, Nicholas Ronde, Co-Founder of the association told the Economist.

The festival, which is also the pilot, will kick off with a Carnival march from UN Plaza to the Katutura Community Arts Centre at 08h00.

A route between central town and Katutura Community Art Centre will be mapped out accordingly to the city regulations that will enable the carnival to begin from the center of town to Katutura Community Art Centre. Besides the participating schools that are part of the initial workshops, a call out for other schools to participate in the festival and carnival will be put out. This is to engage more schools as well as the community at large. We are looking to partner up with other organizations that are willing to participate in the festival while keeping to the theme of addressing water shortage,” Ronde said.

According to Ronde, the associations’ main purpose is to raise awareness on social, economic, artistic, and educational through the means of arts workshops.

As part of its educative programme on climate change, especially on water shortage awareness, the association hosted workshops earlier this year from 3 July until 31 July at different Windhoek-based schools. The classes were compiled as a 4 week course and each workshop was conducted twice a week.

The public can expect performances from talented individual and group performers like Anne Singer, Michael Pulse, Equip Dancing Academy, Eino Kamati and Ona Mogotsi, among others. Entrance is free.


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