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Soldiers handle medical emergencies

Sergeant Major F. Martens and Lt Col A. Moeller (front left), German Ambassador, Egon Kochanke and ATA International director, Trevor Justus, (front right) with the first batch of trainee soldiers to specialise  in medical emergencies. In the back stand Mr P. Schoeman.

Sergeant Major F. Martens and Lt Col A. Moeller (front left), German Ambassador, Egon Kochanke and ATA International director, Trevor Justus, (front right) with the first batch of trainee soldiers to specialise in medical emergencies. In the back stand Mr P. Schoeman.

ATA International has signed a five year contract with the Namibian Defence Force  to train up to 340 soldiers in emergency medical training on basic, intermediate and advanced levels. The training will start with Emergency Medical Technician – Basic level and progress, by year two of the project, to advanced level.
ATA International business development manager, Nicole de Montille says that the contract came to  existence after the need to upskill soldiers in emergency and combat medicine.
She said that ATA International previously worked with the German Advisory Group which has provided key advice and services to the Namibian Defence Force for the past 20 years.  ATA International also provided twenty soldiers with emergency medical training at the Namibian Defence Force military compound in Okahandja in 2011.
“The German Advisory Group funded the initial project and started the first two programmes in order to empower the local people. From that point they withdrew from the project and allowed ATA International to take over the training, resulting in the current five year contract”
“The project is due to expire in 2016, however, looking at the success we have already achieved, we are confident that our relationship with the Namibian Defence Force and German Advisory Group will remain strong,” said de Montille.
ATA International will train four groups of about ten soldiers per year in basic paramedic training, and two groups of the same number at intermediate level. The advanced level training is a year long course, which will be done in the second year of the project.
She said “during these four weeks, the soldiers undertake hands-on practical work experience with ER24 emergency services, and at the trauma and medical casualty wards at the Charlotte Maxeke hospital in Johannesburg. The Trauma Unit at Charlotte Maxeke is recognised as a world-leading health facility, as a result, it provided the soldiers with an in-depth understanding into the ‘real-life’ approach taken in emergency situations.”

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